Upper Edgewater Park Pavilion

Renovation and Expansion

CLEVELAND, OHIO, USA

  • Client: Cleveland MetroParks
  • Status: Complete
  • Size: 135 acres; Existing Pavilion (3,000 SF); (2) Proposed New Pavilions (2,400 SF each)
  • Services: Site Planning and Architectural Design

Since 1895, the iconic Edgewater Park has had a long rich history, providing popular leisure and recreational spaces and activities for Cleveland residents. Today, while maintaining its identity as Edgewater Park, the park is now joined along with five other public spaces and is the westernmost park in the Cleveland Metroparks’ Lakefront Reservation. Edgewater Park encompasses over 135 acres of land and overlooks 6,000 feet of shoreline. The park is divided into upper and lower levels, which are connected by a paved pathway.

As part of Cleveland Metroparks Capital Improvements Phase One Plan, Peninsula Architects has been commissioned to analyze the Upper Pavilion and surrounding site to provide design options and recommendations that would enhance the building as a reservable facility. Built in a Spanish Mission style, the original one-story structure is constructed of solid concrete walls with a stucco finish and a terra cotta tile roof. Two long and narrow wood timber ancillary wings were later added to either side. Through analysis it was determined that these wings were of no historic value, were poorly proportioned for efficient use, and that the wood structure had deteriorated and thus needed to be demolished.

Peninsula Architects developed several design options that redirected paths on the site, creating more privacy for the existing pavilion and added two free-standing pavilions to be proportioned for larger gatherings and events. The overall design provides flexibility to have multiple rentals occur simultaneously.
The extreme lakeside weather conditions were address with new durable building materials and systems in this windy and wet climate. The new pavilions will be built in steel and concrete with large overhangs to protect any wood components in the shelters.